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Wednesday, July 9, 2014

America; Imagine the World Without Her


I saw Dinesh D'Souza's latest film America yesterday, and I'll be thinking about it for a long time. It's in a class by itself, and clearly had a large budget. Considering our present global conflict, and the stakes involved, it's the most important documentary film of our age. 

We live in a time where tyrannical governments - in the name of "democracy" - cloak themselves in false authority, exactly the way monarchies did in ages past. Their core argument and reason for being is that you, the individual, cannot take care of yourself responsibly, and must join the collective and conform to their laws and restrictions. There is an elite, however, that will rule us and live richly and powerfully from our labor; and they're doing it now in Brussels, Washington D.C., London, and elsewhere. This is dangerous, and will lead to terrible oppression and misery, as it always does. 

America is a call to action, as Tom Paine's Common Sense was in 1776. It's not just excellent, it shows real genius at times. 

I'm assuming you haven't seen it, since it just arrived in theaters. Forgive me if you have, and let me know what you think. I can never resist getting to a good film early. I hope you see it soon, because it's mightily encouraging for every God-loving person's understanding of the great conflict in which we're engaged. It will touch anyone who has a shred of integrity and love for human liberty left in their soul.

The beauty of it is that it's ambitious, thorough, intellectually and emotionally honest, unflinching, and powerful. It takes on, from the start, every indictment, accusation, slander, and insult our enemies have thrown in our faces for centuries. It names the names of our accusers, explores their motive to shame us, and takes them apart meticulously the way Lincoln's speeches took apart the Confederate position. Not only that, D'Souza in many cases goes face-to-face in the film with some of our adversaries and allows them to use their own words. He then goes on to expose their misunderstandings and falsehoods without rancor, using facts. He also doesn't dodge America's mistakes.

Saul Alinsky, the Marxist guru of collectivism, gets a complete going-over and exposure as a tool of Frank Nitti and the Chicago mob. Alinsky was apparently and unabashedly proud of his mentors. Hillary Clinton also is smoked out as a dedicated admirer. Elizabeth Warren indicts herself with twisted passion.

D'Souza could have made an emotionally charged documentary that relied on love and patriotism alone, but he knew it wouldn't be enough to get the job done and defeat 'progressives'. He builds his case with the complete and inarguable truth, and only after that light has killed off the darkness of deceit does he then turn on the fountain of heart-felt words, images, and historical evidence. He's on the side of God and the Angels. 

At the end he even talks about his own indictment and plea deal, saying, "I made a mistake. I'm not above the law." But he uses that to show how utterly vulnerable we all are to the limitless forces of the federal government.   

The opening titles, too, are brilliant and moving. A blacksmith forges the letters AMERICA, one by one, and the screen is filled with blueprint-style graphics that illustrate all of our great inventions and national accomplishments. If Hollywood were not entirely rotted from within by crypto-Marxist delusion, the title sequences would be nominated for an Academy Award.